Reserve your seat for one of four seminars taking place in early 2019.

In January and February 2019 Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. will present its 18th annual educational program for clients and colleagues interested in current land use, environmental, and real estate issues affecting commercial and residential development, agriculture, real estate transactions, easements, mining and the construction materials production industry.

A summary of 2018 case law and legislative updates includes the following hot topics for 2019:

  • Air Quality and Climate Change: including CEQA Guidelines and Mandatory Reporting
  • Mining
  • Updating Land Use Entitlements
  • Endangered Species
  • Water Quality and Wetlands
  • Water Rights and Supply
  • Cultural Resources
  • Renewable Energy
  • Environmental Enforcement
  • Hazardous Substance Control and Cleanup
  • Timber Resources
  • CEQA:  Exemptions, Baseline, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change
  • CEQA Litigation
  • Real Estate Acquisition and Development

Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. will present its annual program at four locations: Redding, Modesto, Sacramento and Napa.  Details for the seminars are below.  We hope you can join us and we look forward to seeing you there.

Redding Conference  (To Register for the Redding Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Location: Hilton Garden Inn Redding, 5050 Bechelli Lane, Redding, CA

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Modesto Conference  (To Register for the Modesto Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Location: Double Tree Hotel Modesto, 1150 Ninth Street, Modesto, CA

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Napa Conference  (To Register for the Napa Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Location: Embassy Suites, 1075 California Boulevard, Napa, CA

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Sacramento Conference  (To Register for the Sacramento Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, February 8, 2019

Location: Sacramento Hilton Arden West, 2200 Harvard Street, Sacramento, CA

Registration: 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. with continental breakfast

Program: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

The registration fee for the program is $95.00. Please register early to reserve your seat. Select the links above to see registration details for each location, as they differ. MCLE and AICP CM credits are available (approval pending).

Please call (916) 456-9595 with any questions.

Center for Community Action & Environmental Justice v. City of Moreno Valley (Aug. 23, 2018, case no. D073451) ___ Cal.App.5th ___.

The right of initiative and referendum is embedded in the California Constitution as a result of the nationwide progressive political reform movement that began at the end of the 19th century. In fact, Hiram Johnson rode this political reform issue into the winner’s circle when running for governor in 1910. As a result of its constitutional foundation, the rights of initiative and referendum are closely guarded by the courts. Over time, California courts have generally concluded that citizen voters are co-equal with locally adopted legislative bodies when acting upon legislative matters, including the field of legislative actions involving land use matters. As the most recent case demonstrates, there are state legislative limits on selected land use enactments.

In the City of Moreno Valley, a significant development project was engulfed in litigation challenging the land use approvals, including a development agreement and a CEQA document. The local voters, with the backing of the developer, then qualified an initiative measure repealing the City Council approved development agreement and approving a substantially similar development agreement. Pursuant to the elections code, the City Council faced the option of approving the development agreement as submitted or submitting the measure to the voters for approval. The City Council elected to adopt the measure.

A new round of litigation followed seeking to overturn the re-approved development agreement on several grounds, including the argument that approval of a development agreement was reserved solely to the city council or board of supervisors. This argument was predicated in part on the fact that the development agreement statute expressly allows for referendum of an ordinance approving a development agreement, but is silent with respect to use of the initiative to approve a development agreement and was based on an earlier California Supreme Court decision in Committee of Seven Thousand v. Superior Court (1988) 45 Cal.3d 491, in which the California Supreme Court concluded that implementation of special legislation concerning transportation facility funding in Orange was reserved exclusively to city councils and board of supervisors, not the voters.   

The court of appeal reached a similar conclusion with respect to development agreements. The appellate decision was influenced by the legislative recitals in the development agreement statute as to the need and benefits of stability in the planning and development process evidencing a compelling state interest. The appellate court also recognized as another argument in support of exclusive authority that the development agreement statute contemplates that a development agreement is a negotiated agreement, and that the initiative process is not conducive to negotiation. Because the power of referendum is expressly incorporated into the development agreement statute, the voters still have a protected legislative interest, just one which is less comprehensive in scope when compared to other land use matters.

William Abbott is a shareholder at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann, LLP at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

September 19, 2018 – 11am to 1pm

Presenter: Daniel S. Cucchi, Esq., Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.

The pace of new court rulings affecting land use professionals can be difficult to keep up with. But each one could have a significant impact on a land use professional’s day-to-day activities. If you want to catch up on the latest legal news that will help you implement best practices in your office, this session is for you. Dan will review select cases from 2017 & 2018 and facilitate a discussion about their relevance on employing high-quality land use practice techniques in your office.

When: Wednesday, September 19th

Where: AECOM – Coastal Conference Room 2020 L Street Suite 400 Sacramento, CA 95811

Time: 11AM-1PM

Cost: $20 (Lunch will be provided.)

Approved for 1.5 AICP Law Credits

Deadline to register is Tuesday, September 18 at Noon.

Register now!

Questions, please contact Dan Cucchi at 916.456.9595 or dcucchi@aklandlaw.com

Daniel S. Cucchi is an associate at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc., or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

 

By Kristen Kortick

AB 734 (Bonta)

Since the 2003 publication of the book, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, by Michael Lewis, the A’s franchise made a name for itself as a franchise utilizing creative tactics to keep fans in the stands and the players in the dugout. Enter construction of the new A’s stadium and the California Environmental Quality Act (“CEQA”) review process and that creativity is now looking rather pedestrian. When undertaking construction of a new stadium, the A’s have instead looked to other examples of utilizing CEQA exemptions for construction of new stadiums throughout California rather than forge a new path. The Los Angeles Rams (2009 [City of Industry stadium that never materialized]), Sacramento Kings (2013), Golden State Warriors (2015), and Los Angeles Clippers (2017), all received Legislature approved exemptions from the full CEQA process for construction of new stadium or arena projects, and the A’s now hope to receive the same.

In February 2018, the A’s franchise asked lawmakers to pass a similar bill shielding the organization from elongated environmental suits while streamlining the CEQA process to construct their new stadium. Under Assembly Bill 734, the new A’s stadium needs a completed and certified environmental impact report (“EIR”) or a mitigated negative declaration outlining how the finalized project poses the least harmful impacts to the environment.  The bill further outlines administrative and judicial review procedures including limiting appeals of the project to 270 days from the filing of the certified record to completed Court opinion. All contested cases for the project would bypass the superior court and move straight to appellate review. Costs to the court and lead agencies brought into court for litigation would be subsumed by the project applicant. The project requires LEED certification for all new construction and sets out express benchmarks for projects approvals, public comments, and the timeline for judicial review.

The project has yet to finalize a site, but the organization has narrowed the search to the location of the pre-existing stadium or nearby to Jack London Square in Oakland. The Ballpark is earmarked to open in 2023. Opponents to the CEQA legislation have concerns that various CEQA safeguards would be gravely overlooked by fast tracking the project. In response, the President of the A’s has alleged that the bill asks for the same exemption as its predecessors, such as the Warriors’ San Francisco arena and the Kings’ Sacramento arena and entertainment complex.

Many California residents and concerned environmental advocacy organizations throughout the state have expressed concern over CEQA exemptions for these large scale development projects. These CEQA exemptions, initially championed by Governor Schwarzenegger and continued under Governor Brown, have seen no shortage of opposition. A group of California residents have traveled throughout the state to litigate cases utilizing similar exemptions from CEQA for sports arenas. Although the provisions of past CEQA exemptions contain varied mitigation protocols, the procedures and judicial review of each project remain consistent in each of the prior versions of such legislation. For example, the Kings stadium obtained the CEQA exemption in 2013 for the construction of Golden One Center Arena. The legislative approval of the project included mitigation measures for traffic mitigation and air quality impacts differing from the bill proposed for the A’s stadium. Consistent with the A’s stadium, the Kings arena implemented a 270 day judicial appeal timeline, LEED certification, and schedule for completion of the project’s planning and construction. The Los Angeles Clippers arena in Inglewood also included similar CEQA benchmarks. However, the Clippers arena also included language to fast track needed public transportation infrastructure in furtherance of the 2028 Olympic Games set to take place in Los Angeles.

These CEQA exemptions pose a unique set of hurdles and some would argue a weakening of CEQA law. First, although these exemptions have not allowed for bare bones EIRs or CEQA review, they shorten the comment periods and judicial review of large ticket items. Many opponents to these CEQA exemptions allege the approval allows deep pocket projects to pay their way through environmental protections in the state. So far, Courts have held that past projects with these CEQA exemptions consistently met the commitments under CEQA without needing to implement additional mitigation measures. (See our link to the Court’s opinion in Saltonstall v. City of Sacramento.) Second, the CEQA exemption prioritizes challenges to exemption projects in the courts thus pushing other cases on the court’s docket lower. As one of the most litigation heavy states in the United States, California court dockets are already at full capacity averaging one-and-a-half to two years from filing to finalized opinions. While the exemption may speed up the process of judicial review for a stadium, it is at the cost of all other docketed civil cases on the jurisdictional court’s calendar. Though this has not likely had a tangible burden on the court calendar overall so far (this would be only the fifth of these CEQA exemptions in the last ten years), if this approach were to expand to cover other large-scale projects the courts could see more CEQA cases impacting the appellate court’s docket in the future.

Currently, AB 734 sits in the Senate Appropriations Committee. Voting from the Assembly Floor and Committees would suggest the project is likely to pass and proceed to the Governor’s desk for signature by end of August. Time will tell whether Governor Brown is ready to sign it.

Bill Abbott, the firm’s resident curmudgeon noted: “It is reassuring that CEQA reform exists for the financial upper crust. Perhaps the Legislature will throw a few crumbs to us commoners.

Kristen Kortick is a law clerk at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc., or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

1901 First Street Owner, LLC v. Tustin Unified School Dist. (2018) 21 Cal.App.5th 1186

The methodology for imposing local impact fees is largely left to the discretion of the local agency adopting the impact fees. (AB 1600; Gov. Code §66000, et seq.; the “Mitigation Fee Act”.) As long as there is a reasonable basis for the methodology, a reviewing court should uphold the enacting agency’s approach (e.g., gross building area v. net building area, bedrooms, or EDUs). The notable exception to this involves school impact fees wherein the Legislature set forth the methodology which uses the interior square footage with listed exceptions. Petitioner 1901 First Street Owner, LLC (“First Street”), the developer of a multi-family project, challenged how the methodology was applied to its project. First Street argued that non-inhabited areas such as an interior gym, hallways, and meeting rooms (“interior common areas”) should not be included in the calculation. Initially, the City had agreed with First Street’s opinion and calculated the fee excluding interior common areas. When challenged by the school district, however, the City reversed itself, recalculating the fee to include the interior common areas. As a result, an additional 70,000 square feet were included in the recalculation, which translated to a $238,549.86 increase in the school impact fees. First Street sued and lost at the trial court.

As the interpretation of the statute is purely a legal question, the appellate court applied its independent judgment in interpreting the statute, ultimately agreeing with the City, the school district and the trial court. It found that though detached homes do not include interior common area, this fact was not a basis for reaching a contrary conclusion to that of the City. First Street also argued that it had a vested right based upon a vesting map it processed in conjunction with its entitlements, and as such, the City could only apply its former fee calculation methodology. Citing Government Code section 66498.6, the appellate court noted that the vesting map law does not vest rights as to misinterpretation of state law.

Commentary:  In circumstances involving non-school impact fees, First Street may well have had a winning argument with respect to the effect of the vesting map. As school impact fees are based upon a state-crafted formula, the local agency did not have the discretion to misapply state law.

William W. Abbott is a shareholder at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc., or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

Building Industry Association  – Bay Area v. City of Oakland, 2018 U.S.Dist.LEXIS 18822 (Case No., 15-cv-03392, Feb. 5, 2018)

Fifth Amendment takings challenges to adjudicative land-use exactions and permit conditions are governed by the two-part test in Nollan v. California Coastal Commission, 483 U.S. 825 (1987) and Dolan v. City of Tigard, 512 U.S. 374 (1994).  In Nollan, the Court held that a government could, without paying compensation, demand an easement as a condition for granting a development permit the government was entitled to deny as an exaction of private property, provided that the exaction would substantially advance the same government interest that would furnish a valid ground for denial of the permit. (483 U.S. at pp. 834, 836-837.)  In Dolan, the Court held that the dedication of private property must be “roughly proportional” both in nature and extent to the impact of the proposed development. (512 U.S. at p. 391.)  In Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District, 133 S.Ct. 2586 (2013), the Court held that the Nollan/Dolan test applies to a government’s demand for a monetary exaction imposed on a land-use permit applicant on an ad hoc, adjudicative basis.  But Koontz did not address the question of whether legislatively imposed monetary exactions are also governed by the Nollan/Dolan test.  That led Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to note in early 2016:  “For at least two decades, however, lower courts have divided over whether the Nollan/Dolan test applies in cases where the alleged taking arises from a legislatively imposed condition rather than an administrative one. That division shows no signs of abating.” (Cal. Bldg. Indus. Ass’n v. City of San Jose, 136 S. Ct. 928, 928 (2016) (Thomas, J., concurring in denial of cert.))  Justice Thomas added: “Until we decide this issue, property owners and local governments are left uncertain about what legal standard governs legislative ordinances and whether cities can legislatively impose exactions that would not pass muster if done administratively.”  (Id. at pp. 928–929.)

While waiting for the Supreme Court to decide that question, courts are now having to decide whether the Koontz decision can be interpreted as applying Nollan/Dolan to generally applied and legislatively imposed exactions.  For its part, the California Supreme Court said no:  “The Koontz decision does not purport to decide whether the Nollan/Dolan test is applicable to legislatively prescribed monetary permit conditions that apply to a broad class of proposed developments.”  (California Building Industry Assn. v. City of San Jose (2015) 61 Cal.4th 435, 460 & fn 11, cert. den., Cal. Bldg. Indus. Ass’n v. City of San Jose, supra, 136 S.Ct. 928 (emphasis added).)  Since Koontz does not apply, the existing rule in California is that “legislatively prescribed monetary fees that are imposed as a condition of development are not subject to the Nollan/Dolan test.”  (Ibid. See also San Remo Hotel v. City and County of San Francisco (2002) 27 Cal.4th 643, 663-671; Santa Monica Beach, Ltd. v. Superior Court (1999) 19 Cal.4th 952, 966–967; Ehrlich v. City of Culver City (1996) 12 Cal.4th 854, 874-885 (plur. opn. of Arabian, J.).)  The existing rule in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal is the same.  (See McClung v. City of Sumner, 548 F.3d 1219 (9th Cir. 2008), cert. denied, 556 U.S. 1282 (2009).)

U.S. District Judge Chhabria of the Northern District of California recently came to the same conclusion as the California Supreme Court.  In Building Industry Association  – Bay Area v. City of Oakland, 2018 U.S.Dist.LEXIS 18822 (Case No., 15-cv-03392, Feb. 5, 2018) (“BIA”), Judge Chhabria determined:  “The Court did not hold in Koontz that generally applicable land-use regulations are subject to facial challenge under the exactions doctrine [in Nollan and Dolan].”  (Id. at *5.)  Judge Chhabria reached that conclusion by rejecting the reasoning of fellow U.S. District Judge Breyer in Levin v. City of San Francisco, 71 F.Supp.3d 1072 (N.D. Cal. 2014), appeal dismissed as moot, remanded, 2017 U.S.App.LEXIS 4384 (9th Cir., Feb. 14, 2017).

In Levin, the City and County of San Francisco enacted an ordinance that required property owners who wanted to withdraw their rent-controlled property from the rental market under California’s Ellis Act (Govt. Code §§7060 et seq.) to pay a lump sum to displaced tenants in San Francisco.  Property owners challenged the ordinance as an unconstitutional taking.  Judge Breyer applied Nollan/Dolan to the takings claim because, “[a]s in Koontz, where the monetary exaction was subject to a Nollan/Dolan analysis because the City commanded a monetary payment ‘linked to a specific, identifiable property interest such as a . . . parcel of real property,’ here the Ordinance’s requirement of a monetary payment is directly linked to a property owner’s desire to change the use of a specific, identifiable unit of property.”  (71 F.Supp.3d at p. 1083 (citing Koontz, supra, 133 S.Ct. at p. 2600).)  Judge Breyer distinguished the contrary Ninth Circuit precedent in McClung v. City of Sumner by concluding that “Koontz abrogated McClung’s holding that Nollan/Dolan does not apply to monetary exactions, which is intertwined with and underlies McClung’s assumptions about legislative conditions.” (71 F.Supp.3d at 1083 n.4.)

However, in the recent BIA case, Judge Chhabria disagreed with Judge Breyer and held that Koontz did not address the applicability of Nollan/Dolan to legislative exactions, and therefore did not overturn the Ninth Circuit precedent in McClung. In BIA, the City of Oakland enacted an ordinance that required a developer of a multifamily project with over twenty units to either (i) spend 0.5 percent of building development costs on art displays on the site of the development or a nearby right-of-way; or (ii) pay an equivalent amount to a city-operated fund for public art installations.  The Building Industry Association – Bay Area (“Association”) challenged the validity of the ordinance on the ground that it was an unlawful exaction that violates the “exactions doctrine” applied in Nollan, Dolan and Koontz.  Judge Chhabria disagreed with the Association, and granted the City’s motion to dismiss, for the three several reasons.

First, Judge Chhabria explained that the U.S. Supreme Court has only applied the “exactions doctrine” in cases “involving a particular individual property, where government officials exercised their discretion to require something of the property owner in exchange for approval of a project.”  (2018 U.S.Dist.LEXIS 18822 at *3.)  He added that “the Court has consistently spoken of the doctrine in terms suggesting it was intended to apply only to discretionary decisions regarding individual properties.  (Ibid. (citing Lingle v. Chevron U.S.A. Inc., 544 U.S. 528, 546-47, 125 S. Ct. 2074, 161 L. Ed. 2d 876 (2005).

Second, Judge Chhabria pointed out that both the Ninth Circuit in McClung and the California Supreme Court in Ehrlich have “expressly stated that a development condition need only meet the requirements of Nollan and Dolan if that condition is imposed as an ‘individual, adjudicative decision.’”  (2018 U.S.Dist.LEXIS 18822 at *3.)  Therefore, “[b]roadly applicable regulations like the one at issue in this case are assessed under the Penn Central regulatory takings framework.” (Id. at *3-*4.)

Third, Judge Chhabria rebuffed the Association’s reliance on Judge Breyer’s decision in Levin that held that held that McClung was invalidated by Koontz.  Judge Chhabria explained:

The Court did not hold in Koontz that generally applicable land-use regulations are subject to facial challenge under the exactions doctrine; it held only that the exactions doctrine applies to demands for money (not merely demands for encroachments on property). In reaching this holding, the Court went out of its way to make clear that it was not expanding the doctrine beyond that. See 133 S. Ct. at 2602 (“This case does not require us to say more.”); id. at 2600 n. 2 (“[T]his case does not implicate the question whether monetary exactions must be tied to a particular parcel of land in order to constitute a taking.”). Koontz involved an adjudication by local land-use officials regarding an individual piece of property, and throughout its decision the Court spoke of the exactions doctrine in those terms. For example, the Court stated: “The fulcrum this case turns on is the direct link between the government’s demand and a specific parcel of real property.” 133 S. Ct. at 2600 (emphasis added). “Because of that direct link,” the Court stated, “this case implicates the central concern of Nollan and Dolan: the risk that the government may use its substantial power and discretion in land-use permitting to pursue governmental ends that lack an essential nexus and rough proportionality to the effects of the proposed new use of the specific property at issue, thereby diminishing without justification the value of the property.” Id. (emphasis added); see also id. at 2594 (noting that permit applicants are “especially vulnerable” to government coercion “because the government often has broad discretion to deny a permit that is worth far more than property it would like to take”). The exactions doctrine, in other words, has historically been understood as a means to protect against abuse of discretion by land-use officials with respect to an individual parcels of land, and Koontz itself spoke of it in those terms, undermining Judge Breyer’s argument that Koontz displaced the Ninth Circuit’s rule that the exactions doctrine is unavailable to a plaintiff making a facial challenge to a generally applicable land-use regulation. (Id. at *4-*6.)

Thus, Koontz did not overrule the Ninth Circuit’s legislative exactions analysis in McClung, and under the same rationale did not overrule the California Supreme Court’s holding in Ehrlich.

Judge Chhabria did not explicitly address another argument raised in Levin regarding the McClung decision.  In Levin, Judge Breyer concluded that Koontz abrogated the holding in McClung regarding legislative exactions because the monetary exactions is “intertwined with and underlies McClung’s assumptions about legislative conditions.” (71 F.Supp.3d at 1083 n.4.) In its briefing in Re:  BIA case, the Association similarly argued that “McClung’s discussion of legislative exactions is so entwined with its abrogated repudiation of monetary exactions that the two cannot be parceled out.”  (Opposition to Motion to Dismiss, at 11 fn. 5.)  Judge Chhabria did not address that issue in his order granting the City’s motion to dismiss. However, contrary to Judge Breyer’s statement in Levin, and the Association’s argument in BIA, the McClung court discussed the legislative/adjudicative distinction apart from the “monetary” nature of the particular exactions in that case.  For example:

Next, the McClungs attempt to recast the facts as involving an individualized, discretionary exaction as opposed to a general requirement imposed through legislation. The McClungs make this argument in recognition of the fact that at least some courts have drawn a distinction between adjudicatory exactions and legislative fees, which have less chance of abuse due to their general application. See San Remo Hotel, 41 P.3d at 104 (distinguishing between a fee condition applied to single property that would be subject to Nollan/Dolan review and a generally applicable development fee).  The facts do not support the McClungs falling within the former category. All new developments must have at least 12-inch storm pipe; there is no evidence on the record that the McClungs were singled out. [548 F.3d at 1228–1229.]

Judge Breyer’s decision in Levin did not discuss that analysis and case law in McClung, which is a separate ground that supported the Ninth Circuit’s holding about legislative exactions.  (Cf. United States v. Title Ins. & Trust Co., 265 U.S. 472, 486 (1924) [“where there are two grounds, upon either of which an appellate court may rest its decision, and it adopts both, ‘the ruling on neither is obiter, but each is the judgment of the court and of equal validity with the other’” (citation omitted)); Varshock v. Department of Forestry & Fire Protection (2011) 194 Cal.App.4th 635, 646 fn. 7 [“when a decision is based on two separate grounds, neither is dictum; rather, each ground is equally valid and constitutes an alternative holding in support of the judgment.” (Citation omitted.)])

It is important to note that Judge Chhabria did not decide in BIA whether or not the U.S. Supreme Court should extend Nollan/Dollan to legislative exactions; he merely determined that the High Court had not yet done so.  He explained:

Perhaps reasonable arguments could be made for expanding the reach of the exactions doctrine so that it can be invoked in facial challenges to a generally applicable regulations, rather than merely discretionary decisions regarding an individual property by land-use officials.  But the point, for purposes of this motion, is that it would be an expansion of the doctrine. If that occurs, it should be in the Supreme Court, not the Northern District of California.  [2018 U.S.Dist.LEXIS 18822 at *6 (citation omitted).] [1]

Thus, the District Court recognized, as Justice Thomas observed in early 2016, that the constitutional level of scrutiny for legislative exactions has not yet been decided by the U.S. Supreme Court even after Koontz.

The Association appealed the decision in BIA to the Ninth Circuit on March 5, 2018.  The briefing on that appeal is scheduled to begin on June 13, 2018.

Glen Hansen is Senior Counsel at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann,Inc. at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc., or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

[1] For an extensive analysis of whether Nollan/Dolan applies to legislative exactions, see Glen Hansen, Let’s Be Reasonable: Why Neither Nollan/Dolan nor Penn Central Should Govern Generally-Applied Legislative Exactions After Koontz, 34 Pace Envtl. L. Rev. 237, 242 (2017).

Hauser v. Ventura County Board of Supervisors (2018) 20 Cal.App.5th 572

I will start with the cats. Irena Hauser applied for a conditional use permit to house up to five tigers on her property, located in a rural part of Ventura County. Ms. Hauser proposed three tiger enclosures, an area with a roof, and an eight-foot chain link fence enclosing seven acres. The animals were to be used for filming purposes. 57 residential lots with 28 existing homes were located within a one-half mile radius of the tiger enclosures, with a total of 46 existing homes within one mile. In addition, there were two children’s camps within 2-3 miles. The project site was located in “rugged topography … with dense vegetation.” Ms. Hauser proposed that one family member would always be onsite. She and another family member had attended an eight-day class on animal husbandry, safety and training (as the court noted, there was no written test, and everyone was assured a passing certificate).

As one might predict, the neighbors were opposed, presenting a petition with 11,000 signatures in opposition, news reports of animal maulings, and video of uncaged tigers on the Hauser property in Beverly Hills. The planning commission denied the use permit, as did the Board of Supervisors, the latter on a 4-1 vote. Ms. Hauser filed a writ of mandate challenging the findings adopted in support of the denial claiming a lack of substantial evidence. The appellate court largely deferred to the fact finding undertaken by the Board, noting that the Board was not compelled to believe Hauser’s uncontradicted testimony. With deference to the Board, the appellate court found that the evidence did in fact support the Board’s decision.

While the fate of five tigers is always interesting reading, more important is the court’s decision regarding the effect of communications to the Board members outside of the formal hearing process. The Board members disclosed pre-hearing contacts with both the applicant and opponents (in person and by email). The adopted county rules discouraged ex parte contacts and required disclosure, which the Board members fully complied. The appellate court noted that less formality is required for local government hearings as compared to a judicial hearing and with respect to ex parte contacts cited City of Fairfield v. Superior Court, 14 Cal.3d 768 (1975), in which the California Supreme Court noted “A councilman has not a right but an obligation to discuss issues of vital concern with his constituents.” The potential for bias is insufficient. There must be a probability of actual bias which is constitutionally intolerable. The court viewed that the pre-hearing contacts were quite typical, and no decision maker had promised to vote a certain way. All Board members disclosed the contacts as required by the local code. In the end, Ms. Hauser received a full and fair hearing.

Daniel S. Cucchi is an associate at Abbott & Kindermann, Inc.  For questions relating to this article or any other California land use, real estate, environmental and/or planning issues contact Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. at (916) 456-9595.

The information presented in this article should not be construed to be formal legal advice by Abbott & Kindermann, Inc., or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Because of the changing nature of this area of the law and the importance of individual facts, readers are encouraged to seek independent counsel for advice regarding their individual legal issues.

 

Reserve your seat for one of four annual seminars taking place in early 2018 in Sacramento, Napa, Redding and Modesto.

In January 2018 Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. will present its 17th annual educational program for clients and colleagues interested in current land use, environmental, and real estate issues affecting commercial and residential development, agriculture, real estate transactions, easements, mining and the construction materials production industry.

A summary of 2017 case law and legislative updates includes the following hot topics for 2018:

  • Air Quality and Climate Change – Including CEQA Guidelines, Cap-And-Trade
  • Updating Land Use Entitlements
  • Endangered Species
  • Water Quality and Wetlands – Including New State Wetlands Programs
  • CEQA:  Exemptions, Baseline, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change
  • CEQA Litigation
  • Water Rights and Supply
  • Cultural Resources
  • Mining, Oil and Gas
  • Renewable Energy
  • Environmental Enforcement
  • Hazardous Substance Control and Cleanup
  • Timber Resources
  • Real Estate Acquisition and Development
  • Subdivision Map Act

Details for each of the seminars is below.  We hope you can join us and we look forward to seeing you there.


Redding Conference (To Register for the Redding Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 19, 2018

Location: Hilton Garden Inn Redding, 5050 Bechelli Lane

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Sacramento Conference (To Register for the Sacramento Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 26, 2018

Location: Sacramento Hilton Arden West, 2200 Harvard Street

Registration: 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. with continental breakfast

Program: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Modesto Conference (To Register for the Modesto Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, February 2, 2018

Location: Double Tree Hotel Modesto, 1150 Ninth Street

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Napa Conference (To Register for the Napa Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Location: Embassy Suites, 1075 California Boulevard

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The registration fee for the program is $80.00. Please register early to reserve your seat. Select the links above to see registration details for each location, as they differ. MCLE and AICP CM credits are available.

Please call (916) 456-9595 with any questions.


Reserve your seat for one of four annual seminars taking place in early 2018 in Sacramento, Napa, Redding and Modesto.

In January 2018 Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. will present its 17th annual educational program for clients and colleagues interested in current land use, environmental, and real estate issues affecting commercial and residential development, agriculture, real estate transactions, easements, mining and the construction materials production industry.

A summary of 2017 case law and legislative updates includes the following hot topics for 2018:

  • Air Quality and Climate Change – Including CEQA Guidelines, Cap-And-Trade
  • Updating Land Use Entitlements
  • Endangered Species
  • Water Quality and Wetlands – Including New State Wetlands Programs
  • CEQA:  Exemptions, Baseline, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change
  • CEQA Litigation
  • Water Rights and Supply
  • Cultural Resources
  • Mining, Oil and Gas
  • Renewable Energy
  • Environmental Enforcement
  • Hazardous Substance Control and Cleanup
  • Timber Resources
  • Real Estate Acquisition and Development
  • Subdivision Map Act

Details for each of the seminars is below.  We hope you can join us and we look forward to seeing you there.


Redding Conference (To Register for the Redding Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 19, 2018

Location: Hilton Garden Inn Redding, 5050 Bechelli Lane

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Sacramento Conference (To Register for the Sacramento Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 26, 2018

Location: Sacramento Hilton Arden West, 2200 Harvard Street

Registration: 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. with continental breakfast

Program: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Modesto Conference (To Register for the Modesto Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, February 2, 2018

Location: Double Tree Hotel Modesto, 1150 Ninth Street

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Napa Conference (To Register for the Napa Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Location: Embassy Suites, 1075 California Boulevard

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The registration fee for the program is $80.00. Please register early to reserve your seat. Select the links above to see registration details for each location, as they differ. MCLE and AICP CM credits are available.

Please call (916) 456-9595 with any questions.


Reserve your seat for one of four annual seminars taking place in early 2018 in Sacramento, Napa, Redding and Modesto.

In January 2018 Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. will present its 17th annual educational program for clients and colleagues interested in current land use, environmental, and real estate issues affecting commercial and residential development, agriculture, real estate transactions, easements, mining and the construction materials production industry.

A summary of 2017 case law and legislative updates includes the following hot topics for 2018:

  • Air Quality and Climate Change – Including CEQA Guidelines, Cap-And-Trade
  • Updating Land Use Entitlements
  • Endangered Species
  • Water Quality and Wetlands – Including New State Wetlands Programs
  • CEQA:  Exemptions, Baseline, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change
  • CEQA Litigation
  • Water Rights and Supply
  • Cultural Resources
  • Mining, Oil and Gas
  • Renewable Energy
  • Environmental Enforcement
  • Hazardous Substance Control and Cleanup
  • Timber Resources
  • Real Estate Acquisition and Development
  • Subdivision Map Act

Details for each of the seminars is below.  We hope you can join us and we look forward to seeing you there.


Redding Conference (To Register for the Redding Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 19, 2018

Location: Hilton Garden Inn Redding, 5050 Bechelli Lane

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Sacramento Conference (To Register for the Sacramento Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, January 26, 2018

Location: Sacramento Hilton Arden West, 2200 Harvard Street

Registration: 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. with continental breakfast

Program: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Modesto Conference (To Register for the Modesto Location Click Here)

Date: Friday, February 2, 2018

Location: Double Tree Hotel Modesto, 1150 Ninth Street

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Napa Conference (To Register for the Napa Location Click Here)

Date: Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Location: Embassy Suites, 1075 California Boulevard

Registration: 12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Program: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The registration fee for the program is $80.00. Please register early to reserve your seat. Select the links above to see registration details for each location, as they differ. MCLE and AICP CM credits are available.

Please call (916) 456-9595 with any questions.